Canning Event Stretches Across US

This post by Kim O'Donnel which ran in the Huffington Post, The United States of Canning, explains the genesis of an event coming soon to Boston/Somerville!

For me, a canning novice with a too-tiny kitchen, I want to go and learn from others what I can. But, given the circumstances I don't expect I'll be doing a whole lot of canning myself. I promise to bring you an overview of the day, however and it looks to be a great one at that.

Just check out Linsey Herman's Cake and Commerce blog here, Join the Canvolution.

→ Note: this event is sold out. If you want to get on a waitlist or let Linsey know we should have a second event, please go to her blog via one of these links and do so!

Can-o-rama Cantacular Schedule, August 30th, 2009
 
10:15 am: Welcome & Introduction
Because this event is both about canning and fostering community, we'll be starting things off with introductions. We're pleased to meet you!
 
We'll discuss the benefits and joys of canning and go over some of the techniques we'll be using throughout the day.
 
11:00 am: Boiling Water Canning   - Linsey
This is the most common form of canning for home cooks and requires the least specialized equipment. We'll show you how to can tomato sauce, pickles, or jams and jellies. 
 
12:00 noon: Lacto-Fermentation and other methods of putting by  - Alex
A tradtional method for putting food by, lacto-fermentation is at the root of sauerkraut, kimchi, some pickles, corned beef and many other well-known savory treats. Alex will show you how to get your own sauerkraut going and demonstrate how you can lactoferment your own vegetables at home. (note: we won't can lacto-fermented vegetables because the processing kills off the beneficial bacteria).
 
1:00 Pressure Canning   -  Nika
Exurban homesteader and scientist Nika Boyce will de-mystify pressure canning, which has long been seen by many home canners as dangerous. difficult or just too durn technical. Nika will present pressure canning and explain how to use the pressure canner to put by just about any low-acid food.
 
2:00 More Boiling Water Canning
Why not? This is the most common form of canning for home cooks and requires the least specialized equipment. We'll show you how to can tomato sauce, pickles, or jams and jellies. 
 
3:00 pm on...
We'll spend the rest of the day using what we learned to can everything we have. Come join us for recipe making, canning, and chit-chat!
 

# # #

For me, the idea of self-sufficiency is so appealing. Confidence in the kitchen, access to wholesome food year-round, and saving money; these are all bonuses. Right now I have homemade yogurt, mayonnaise, sourdough bread in my kitchen as well as jams/preserves from three friends. A friend was ribbing me about becoming a hippie housewife and then I pointed out that I can bake bread for pennies, make mayo with good eggs and quality oils, and my yogurt is made from Richardson's 2% and costs pennies. It also all tastes wonderful. 

If you're interested and intrigued - stay tuned, I'll be posting after the event, too. 

 

Other links:

  • Canning Across America
  •  includes recipes and posts by the likes of John-be-still-my-heart-Besh and lots of great resources

  • Kim O'Donnel on HuffPo covers the genesis of the event 
  • Edible Boston Canning Preserving Event
  • New England Organic Farmers' Association Food Preservation Event.